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insomnia  

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TMBL
 TMBL
(@tmbl)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 44
11/03/2019 12:49 pm  

Insomnia is the number one EHS symptom.  There are several nutrients that the general population do not have in high enough volumes in their body.  Modern agricultural practices are depleting the soils of these nutrients.  Magnesium is one of the nutrients many people are deficient in.  Magnesium is involved in hundreds of biological processes, more biological processes than any other nutrient it seems.  And magnesium improves sleep.

Magnesium has numerous other benefits for the body and comes in a number of forms.  I'm no scientist, but I think they can bind a magnesium molecule to some other molecule so that there is a two in one benefit.  So you can get a form of magnesium that also benefits your heart function.  There is a form of magnesium for brain function.  Etc, etc.  The most commonly available form of magnesium is magnesium citrate.  This will make your bowel motions more loose, so it is great if you are constipated.

Some forms of magnesium are more easily absorbed and bio-available than others.  So do your research and decide on the form of magnesium that best suits your needs.  As with any supplement, do your research on side effects, overdose symptoms, contra-indications (who shouldn't take it) and natural sources of the nutrient.  Happy sleeping!  zzz....

 

 


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NatureFirst
(@naturefirst)
Active Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 10
11/03/2019 1:14 pm  

The use of tech devices before bedtime is another cause of delayed sleep onset. Blue light from the screen suppresses diurnal release of Melatonin by the pineal gland, and microwaves stimulate brain activity. Studies show it takes 1-2 hours after cessation of exposure for the body to return to normal.

Free apps are available for most operating systems that after dark automatically shift the color balance toward the warmer part of the spectrum. Maybe those orange sunsets have more than just scenic value.

Subject to professional medical advice, here is a list of supplements claimed to help cope with EMR. https://www.best-emf-health.com/protection-from-emf.html


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beagle
(@beagle)
Active Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 10
13/03/2019 2:20 pm  

I have been collecting data on my "normalisation" of sleep patterns with withdrawal from emr. I did have high levels of foreign frequencies on my household power supply and believe the use of the filters from emfields-solutions has assisted with this problem in my case - sleep patterns improved.

Time of day and length of exposure to household wifi, and tower emissions, result in varying effects on sleep but it's only possible to see the pattern with this after substantial avoidance and then re-introduction. Morning use seems less problematic than later in the day use but even 12 to 2pm presence in a house with a switched on wireless modem at some distance can be problematic for me for the next 36 hours.

Apart from avoidance, magnesium supplementation is very important to me in reducing that "wired" feeling - even with my normal hard-wired computer use, I notice the difference if I have not taken this supplementation.


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TMBL
 TMBL
(@tmbl)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 44
14/03/2019 9:06 am  

Beagle, thanks for sharing your observations with us.  I absolutely agree with you that it is not just the hour before bed that is critical for a good night's sleep.  I have observed, and this doesn't happen consistently, that I will wake bright eyed and bushy tailed for about 2 hours, approximately 11-12 hours after a significant exposure to mobile phones.

These 2 hour wakings intrigue me.  You could just about set a stop watch by it.  It will take me exactly 2 hours to get back to sleep.  I have noticed also that sometimes during the day or night, I will have EHS symptoms exactly 2 hours apart.  I wonder if the 2 hours is something transmitting at 2 hourly intervals and after lying awake for two hours, the next transmission sets my body back to homeostasis, allowing me to resume sleep.  Or does the first transmission cause a surge of adrenaline through my body that takes two hours to wear off?

I do occasionally lie awake longer or shorter periods and maybe that is related to my current EMR body burden.  Maybe those who are not EHS only have to worry about the one hour before bedtime, and the more sensitive and exposed we are, the longer the period before bed we have to avoid EMR.


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beagle
(@beagle)
Active Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 10
19/03/2019 1:13 pm  

Interesting, TMBL - I favour the adrenaline idea - and its considerable time to "wear off". Probably more than just adrenaline - but I prefer the idea of chemical changes as a cause, to the "tranmissions varying" idea.

[For me the "tired but wired" sensation is a bit the same sensation as being overloaded on caffeine or chocolate (without the jitters) - if the exposure is not too high I will "sleep" but not normally, if the exposure is higher I may drop off and then wake and remain awake for usually about two hours. I know that some people who overindulge in alcohol also have that pattern of dropping off to sleep and then wakening around 2 to 3am but it might be a different set of chemicals for them.]


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41Earth
(@41earth)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 8
01/04/2019 9:13 pm  

I agree that insomnia is #1 symptom of EMR. When I am around people with mobile phones in the day I can be sure of a poor sleep that night. Sleeping through the night is so rare for me but it seems to correlate to several things (that all need to happen):-

* no exposure to people with iphones or wi-fi
* not looking at the computer screen for at least 2 hours before going to bed (even with f.lux that makes my screen orangish)
* drinking at least 4-5 glasses of water that day (I keep forgetting)
* doing about 20mins yoga before going to sleep
* avoiding consumption of salty food especially in the evening
* not drinking fluids for the hour or two before going to sleep

All these factors combined rarely happen on the same day so my pattern is to fall asleep when I hit the pillow then wake up 3 hours later, lie there till sunrise then get another hour or two before getting up exhausted, every morning. Sigh.

Tried melatonin caps, did nothing. Maybe should try the Mg again...


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TMBL
 TMBL
(@tmbl)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 44
02/04/2019 9:42 am  

41 Earth,

interesting about the salt consumption before bed.  I'd have thought it would help because it would dehydrate you, eliminating the need for a trip to the toilet.  I believe sodium and potassium might be key elements in EHS.  Maybe your body is saying that it needs you to balance the sodium with a higher intake of potassium and what is better for sleep than bananas?

I'm sure magnesium would help you.  A couple of other supplements, which I am a little reluctant to recommend, are 5-HTP and tryptophan.  I believe tryptophan is in high levels in turkey meat.  Apparently some people respond better to 5-HTP and others do better on tryptophan.  Or you could try both, though I'd recommend trying one at a time to see which works better for you and then titrate up the dose of both and see if taking both is better than taking only one.  

The reason I am reluctant to recommend taking amino acids is that I have heard occasional opposition to them but have been unable to hone in on what problems they cause.  I do know that taking melatonin every day is not a good idea as the body gets lazy and stops producing its own melatonin.  Path to dependence.  I take melatonin as a rare treat, not a birth-right.

It's also important to not overdo taking supplements as they can overload the liver, leading to liver dysfunction.  Spreading them through the day as much as possible helps.

I agree with the water consumption bit.  These days I fill a one litre bottle with water at the start of the day and scold myself if I haven't consumed that and refilled the bottle and consumed it as well by the end of the day (2 litres in all).  Does anyone know if having a cup of herbal tea doesn't cut it as water consumption?  Are herbal teas dehydrating or diuretic?  I know that black tea, and I think also green tea, and coffee are diuretic.


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TMBL
 TMBL
(@tmbl)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 44
03/04/2019 1:42 pm  

Here's a tip that some insomniacs are probably not going to thank me for.  I am hearing from a number of sources that it is essential to be asleep by 10 pm.  The sleep that is had between the hours of 10 pm and 2 am is more beneficial to the body than the sleep after 2 am.  And the sleep between 10 pm and midnight is even better still than the sleep between midnight and 2 am.

One other benefit of going to bed ridiculously early (say, 8 pm) if your sleep patterns are totally erratic is if you cop one of those bad nights where you lie awake for 3 hours, you've got time on your side to make up for it before the birds wake you again.  The downside of going to bed that early is trying to educate your phoning friends and relatives on what your bedtime is.


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TMBL
 TMBL
(@tmbl)
Eminent Member
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 44
17/08/2019 12:10 pm  

Can you die from lack of sleep?   https://www.abc.net.au/life/can-you-die-from-lack-of-sleep/11216900


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You are not alone. According to certain experts, over 35% of the world’s population feels some form of unwanted reaction to EMR exposure. Additionally, everyone is susceptible to induced biological abnormalities that may not manifest perceptibly for years or even decades.